Your University, One Photo at a Time

Round Reading Room

Reading (Room) in the Fog

Reading (Room) in the FogThe Round Reading Room entrance (although it doesn’t look very round from this angle) on a foggy night. What this photo really needs is a layer of fog covering the ground as well, but the shadows on the trees work too. Oh, and a traffic cone. Gotta have a traffic cone.

[January-February 2011 Poll: Which of the University's student media do you follow?]
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© 2011 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Autumn in Glasgow

Autumn in GlasgowThe most colourful of seasons, as seen at the University of Glasgow. The above scene is from Library Hill, looking up at the Fraser Building and the Round Reading Room.

Seeing as how I have in previous years at Glasgow forgotten to capture the autumn landscape, I made an effort to counter that this autumn. In keeping with that, I’ll post some autumn scenes from the University of Glasgow in the following days.

The problem I now have is that I took too many autumn photos around campus and I’m having a hard time picking a select few.

[Sept-Oct 2010 Poll: What societies have you been a member of at Glasgow University?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Pigeon, Bench and Round Reading Room

Pigeon, Bench and Round Reading RoomAfter several days of detailed posts, something random. A round building built as a reading room, a bench in the form of an anatomy table, and a fat pigeon. Enjoy.

[Sept-Oct 2010 Poll: What societies have you been a member of at Glasgow University?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Roond Cludgie

Roond Cludgie

 

The round wooden centrepiece of the Round Reading Room (where pretty much everything is round) features a small staircase to another floor and beyond, to the toilets. Yeah, glamorous, isn’t it? Apparently there’s also a study room down there, but in posting this I realized that I’ve never actually gone down those stairs. At one point I was thinking of all the different places around campus which I want to feature, for example as many lecture theatres and cafes and libraries I can get around to photographing. Toilets? Should they be included in this list?

I don’t know why I decided to title this post in Scots, but it sounded better than “Round Toilets”. If the translation is wrong, blame online translators, and my ineptitude, of course.

[Summer 2010 Poll: Where Are You From?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Inside the Orbicular Building

Inside the Orbicular BuildingA slightly HDR-esque view from inside the Round Reading Room, which is no longer really a reading room, but rather a an interesting circular array of computers and desks. Built in 1939, the listing building on University Avenue is really quite remarkable, filled with little bits of interesting detail and decoration everywhere. The best thing about the Round Reading Room (or the McMillan Reading Room, as it used to be called, or is officially known as) is that it is still a relatively unknown entity, as you’re pretty likely to find a free computer there during the week, when the University Library is absolutely packed. The round bit this the middle of the building will be featured tomorrow. Any idea what it could be?

[Summer 2010 Poll: Where Are You From?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Green Around Campus

Green Around CampusWith Spring on its way, the Gilmorehill campus is starting to look greener every day. Compare this view to a similar view from back last October, when everything was covered in autumn colours. Like that photo, I took this one from one of the windows in the tower of the Glasgow University Library.

You’ll also notice that the scaffolding on the Main Building has now completely overtaken one wing of the building, covering the brunt of the Hunterian Museum for its roofworks, under way for the better part of the next year, perhaps more. You can see what the interior of the Hunterian Museum looks like all packed up here. You may also notice that there is scaffolding and workmen on the John McIntyre Building, which is also closed for renovations, and the SRC has moved around the corner to Southpark Avenue.

As you walk around campus, you’ll notice that the Main Building and the John McIntyre Building aren’t the only ones covered in scaffolding. The tenements on Hillhead Street and Great George Street, which contain the Student Apartments and academic offices, have been covered for the entire academic year, there’s scaffolding on the Boyd Orr Building and the Kelvin Building, and several other places around campus.

[Poll #11: Where did you live in your first year at Glasgow University?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

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Q is for… Queen Margaret College [ABC Sundae]

Q is for... Queen Margaret College

Women have only been permitted to study at Scottish universities since 1892. Before that, the movement for the higher education of women was strong in Glasgow and in 1877 the Glasgow Association for the Higher Education of Women was founded. The principal of Glasgow University at the time, John Caird, was the first Chairman of its General Committee.

The Association offered lectures by University professors in class rooms at the University. In 1883 the Association became the Queen Margaret College, the first and only college in Scotland to provide higher education for women.

The Queen Margaret College was based on Queen Margaret Drive, across the street from the Botanic Gardens just north of the University. When women were allowed to study at University from 1892 onwards, the Queen Margaret College merged with the University of Glasgow. The building on Queen Margaret Drive remained in use for teaching, although with time the uses of the building moved to Gilmorehill, eventually leaving the building solely for administrative purposes in 1934.

Queen Margaret College was fully incorporated into the the University of Glasgow in 1935, with the building on Queen Margaret Drive becoming the headquarters of BBC Scotland. The student union of the Queen Margaret College, the Queen Margaret Union, which spent its time moving around Gilmorehill after its inception, became the University’s female-only student union, alongside the male-only Glasgow University Union.

The above plaque, located on the backside of the Round Reading Room, commemorates Frances Helen Melville, the last mistress of Queen Margaret College from 1909 to its closure in 1935 and the first female Bachelor of Divinity in Scotland.

The University of Glasgow Story website has an article on the history of women at the University, much more detailed than the above. In addition, a book was launched this month titled ‘Ladies First: The History of the Queen Margaret Union’.

I mentioned Queen Margaret 14 times in this post. Who is this Queen Margaret that the Queen Margaret College was named after? The answer: Saint Margaret of Scotland (c. 1045-1093), the wife of King Malcolm III.

ABC Sundae is a fortnightly theme day, occurring every other Sunday, one letter of the alphabet at a time. Click here for more ABC Sundae.

[Poll #11: Where did you live in your first year at Glasgow University?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

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Fraser Building and Round Reading Room

Fraser Building and Round Reading Room

Continuing with night shots for no particular reason, here’s the Fraser Building and the Round Reading Room late in the evening (6pm) back in December, taken while sitting outside the Hunterian Art Gallery. If you look at the smoke rising from the Round Reading Room you can tell the shot is a long exposure photo. I quite like the fact that the moon kinda looks like a really bright star or the sun at night.

[Poll #8: What's Your New Year's Resolution for 2010?]
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© 2009-2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

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Memorial Gates and Round Reading Room

Memorial Gates and Round Reading Room

I’ve shown the Memorial Gates a few times, from the University Avenue side. Yes, it looks pretty much the same from the other side, except the names of the important people associated with the University of Glasgow are only on the other side.

Instead of the North Front of the Main Building, the round building on the other side of the gates is theRound Reading Room. With the exception of the University Tower and the Cloisters, the Memorial Gates is probably the most often photographed part of the University, typically from either right on the other side of the gates or from the front of the Round Reading Room. This, however, is not a typical shot. Enjoy. (I’ll get one late at night one day.)

[Poll #7: What grade would you give the year 2009?]
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© 2009 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

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November 2009 Recap and Poll Results [GlasgowUniPhoto.com]

The winner of The Ugliest Building at Glasgow University is… the Boyd Orr Building!! Hurray!

The 1960s were not a good time for Glasgow University, architecturally speaking. The November poll asked for visitors’ opinions on the ugliest building on campus and out of the top ten ugliest buildings on campus, six (6!!!) were built in the 1960s. Running down the list below, we have the Adam Smith Building (1967), Queen Margaret Union (1969), Rankine Building (1969), University Library (1968), Stevenson Building (1961) and the Fraser Building (originally built in 1966, refurbished for 2009).  The odd ones out are the winner, the Boyd Orr Building, opened in 1972, the Round Reading Room, which predates the move of the University to Gilmorehill, the Joseph Black Building, built between 1936 and 1954 and extended in the 1960s and 1982, and finally the enigmatic Maths Building, for which I couldn’t find a year that it opened, although I know it was pretty much the same time as the Boyd Orr Building.

In other words, six of the ugliest buildings at Glasgow University, two are from the very early 1970s, and one more was extended in the 1960s. Not a very good decade I guess.

Top ten ugliest buildings below, full results of the poll here.

Below are thumbnails to all the 30 posts from the past month.

November 1st: E is for... Education [ABC Sundae]November 2nd: Welcome To The Fraser BuildingNovember 3rd: Student ServicesNovember 4th: Service DeskNovember 5th: Food For ThoughtNovember 6th: Student DiningNovember 7th: Collages and MirrorsNovember 8th: Someone Loves BooksNovember 9th: Morning Over GlasgowNovember 10th: Wellington Church at NightNovember 11th: Remembrance DayNovember 12th: QMU By-ElectionNovember 13th: Sir Gilbert Scott BuildingNovember 14th: Bust of MacLellanNovember 15th: F is for... Food [ABC Sundae]November 16th: What's This Doing In Glasgow Cathedral?November 17th: Sir Alexander Stone BuildingNovember 18th: Debating at Glasgow UniversityNovember 19th: Autumn Is Almost OverNovember 20th: A Lecturer's View, Adam Smith T415November 21st: Adam Smith Lecture Theatre T415November 22nd: The View from Adam Smith T415November 23rd: View North from Adam Smith T415November 24th: Books Cast Away?November 25th: Lion On The RoofNovember 26th: PinkNovember 27th: Diagram of an ObjectNovember 28th: Flint ArrowheadsNovember 29th: G is for... Graffiti [ABC Sundae]November 30th: Bagpipes

As a final note, my apologies for the non-daily posting. I’m attempting to get the blog up to date by posting everything retroactively.

The last poll for 2009 asks how you would grade the past year.


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