Your University, One Photo at a Time

Night

BOB in the Night

BOB in the NightTo round off the week of foggy photos, we have Lilybank Gardens and the Boyd Orr Building. By this point the fog had pretty much faded. In my rush to (unsuccessfully) photograph the University Tower in the fog, I missed the opportunity to capture the top half of the Boyd Orr Building completely encased in the fog, with only the lights breaking through.

[January-February 2011 Poll: Which of the University's student media do you follow?]
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© 2011 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Towering Library in the Fog

Towering Library in the FogThe lights on top of the Mackintosh House and the Hunterian Art Gallery kinda mess with the effect I was trying to go with here, diminishing the ghostly blue and white of the Library‘s windows as it disappears into the fog. Still, kinda creepy but captivating.

[January-February 2011 Poll: Which of the University's student media do you follow?]
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© 2011 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Library Hill in the Fog

Library Hill in the FogOf all the foggy photos I’ve posted thus far, this one from Library Hill is probably my favourite, mainly due to the lights reflected of the colours of the Fraser Building to the right, and the Library disappearing on the left.

[January-February 2011 Poll: Which of the University's student media do you follow?]
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© 2011 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Reading (Room) in the Fog

Reading (Room) in the FogThe Round Reading Room entrance (although it doesn’t look very round from this angle) on a foggy night. What this photo really needs is a layer of fog covering the ground as well, but the shadows on the trees work too. Oh, and a traffic cone. Gotta have a traffic cone.

[January-February 2011 Poll: Which of the University's student media do you follow?]
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© 2011 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

North Front in the Fog

North Front in the FogThe North Front of the Gilbert Scott Building and the Memorial Gates in the foggy night. I’m quite fond of the shadows the lights create onto University Avenue. Shame about the scaffolding covering the eastern side of the North Front (but they should be coming down by the end of the academic year).

[January-February 2011 Poll: Which of the University's student media do you follow?]
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© 2011 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Foggy Campus

Foggy CampusAh, another foggy night in Glasgow. Noticed the fog out of my window around midnight, grabbed the camera and tripod and ran over to the University, trying to make it to get a shot of the University Tower lit up in the fog. As you can see, unfortunately, I didn’t make it.

I’ll be posting a few more foggy photos for the next few days. It’s such a rare and interesting event that I might as well make the most of it.

[January-February 2011 Poll: Which of the University's student media do you follow?]
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© 2011 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Spikes and Spires in the Night

Spikes and Spires in the NightThere’s something about the University at night which makes it have a completely different character to it, especially the oldest sections of Gilmorehill. It may be the Gothic revival architecture, or the contrasts all over the place, or something else. Here’s one, taken at night in the moonlight, of the University Tower and the spikes on the fence which lines the length of University Avenue.

By the way, how awesome is the moss on the roof of the security gatehouse by the Main Gate?

[January-February 2011 Poll: Which of the University's student media do you follow?]
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© 2011 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

J is for… James II, Bishop Turnbull, and Pope Nicholas V [ABC Sundae]

J is for... James II, Bishop Turnbull, and Pope Nicholas V [ABC Sundae]The University of Glasgow was founded by James II, King of Scots, William Turnbull, Bishop of Glasgow, and Pope Nicholas V. I figured I would write a little bit about the founders. Just a tiny bit, not a full history or anything.

King James II
James II (1430-1460) reigned as King of Scots from 1437 to his death. He ascended to the throne after the assassination of his father, James I. He took up the regency in 1448 at the age of 18, having studied at the University of St Andrews, which had been founded in 1410-1413.

He died in 1460, but unlike his father he was not assassinated. No, the story is a bit weirder. Short story: James II died at the siege of Roxburgh Castle when one of his cannons exploded. Long story: An ardent supporter of artillery, James II was testing his new cannon (which he called Lion) on the battlements when he died. The cannon, as cannons from the era sometimes did, exploded, and he had insisted on standing by when they tested the cannon. The explosion shattered his right leg and he eventually died of loss of blood.

Bishop Turnbull
William Turnbull (c1400-1454), the Bishop of Glasgow, was instrumental in founding the University of Glasgow, and is considered its founder. Having studied at the Universities of St Andrews, Leuven (Belgium) and Pavia (Italy), he befriended James II upon his return and became Keeper of the Privy Seal and Royal Secretary. In 1448 he was appointed Bishop of Glasgow which he held until his death in 1454.

Turnbull believed that a University would increase the status of Glasgow (which at the time had a population of less than 3,000). Although having a history stretching back centuries and several notable ecclesiastical institutions such as the Glasgow Cathedral, it was an inconsiderable town.

Upon the establishment of the University of Glasgow, Turnbull became the first Chancellor of the University and oversaw the first years of the fledgling institution at the Glasgow Cathedral.

Pope Nicholas V
Tomaso Parentucelli (1397-1455) became Pope in 1447. He studied Theology at the University of Bologna. He issued the Papal Bull which granted the establishment of the University of Glasgow, and provided for the foundation of studies in not just law and theology, but also the study of arts for younger students.

The University of Glasgow was to be modelled after the University of Bologna, where the students had an important influence in the corporation. In the case of Glasgow, matriculated students and the Rector (who represents the students) were to be part of the general meetings of the University’s decision-making process.

Considering the three men died within a decade of the establishment of the University, and within five years of each other, it was just the right time in history for the University of Glasgow to be established.

ABC Sundae is a fortnightly theme day, occurring every other Sunday, one letter of the alphabet at a time.
Click here for more ABC Sundae.

[January-February 2011 Poll: Which of the University's student media do you follow?]
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© 2011 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

560th Anniversary of the University of Glasgow

560th Anniversary of the University of GlasgowThe papal bull which granted permission for the foundation of the University was signed 560 years ago on this day, January 7th, 1451, by Pope Nicholas V. In other words, congratulations to the University of Glasgow! I once came across a photo of the University’s fifth centenary celebrations in 1951, when they had five spotlights beaming towards the heavens at night from the University, which you can see here. Wish I’d been here then, but being in a University that’s 560 years old is still quite fantastic. The Memorial Gates, which are visible behind the light-writing, were installed in 1951 to mark the 500th anniversary of the University of Glasgow.

The above night-time photo is from the very first time I attempted light-writing, you can see another example of this from a week ago here. I don’t know if it’s any good, but I quite like it. If people think the above is good, I’m tempted to go attempt more sometime soon.

[January-February 2011 Poll: Which of the University's student media do you follow?]
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© 2011 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Happy New Year 2011!

Happy New Year 2011!

The last year has been quite tumultuous for this photoblog, with technical difficulties (broken laptop), misplaced photos, website issues, and problems juggling all my extra-curricular activities. There are a lot of very interesting photos I have saved up from the last year, and the coming months will be quite interesting in terms of what I’ll be posting here. I’ve been doing a lot of catching up on the blog, so hopefully we’ll be back to daily posts!

This is one of my first attempts at light writing, and much of the work was done by my fiancée Nora, who is slightly visible in the photo. All I did was set the camera on a very long exposure, on a tripod, and said “GO!”. Nora then had the job of writing GLASGOW, with a LED flashlight, letter by letter, backwards. I dare say she did an amazing job at too! We did consider writing GLASGOW UNIVERSITY, but I think we’ll practise simpler light writing a few more times before we get to that.

Without further ado, Happy New Year!

[January-February 2011 Poll: Which of the University's student media do you follow?]
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© 2011 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Night on Campus

Night on Campus It’s been a while since I posted a night-time photo of the University of Glasgow. Guess I’ve been a bit too busy to drag my tripod to campus late in the evening, in the bitter early Winter cold. To make up for that I have a few great ones lined up, with an interesting little twist to them.

Question: Is there something specific on campus that looks great at night, one which I haven’t featured before? My previous night-time photos of the University can be found here.

[Nov-Dec 2010 Poll: Should the University Library be open 24 hours a day?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Darkest Days

Darkest DaysDecember 21st marks the winter solstice in the UK, the shortest day and the longest night of the year. For the occasion, a dark view of the Cloisters underneath Bute Hall in the University’s Main Building.

[Nov-Dec 2010 Poll: Should the University Library be open 24 hours a day?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

G is for… Ghosts at the University of Glasgow [ABC Sundae]

G is for... Ghosts at the University of Glasgow [ABC Sundae]I’ve been wondering for ages if there are any ghosts living at the University of Glasgow, or ghost stories associated with it, so I’ve been doing some digging online. Surprisingly, I couldn’t really find that much. Some sources claimed that Glasgow was “the most haunted place in Scotland”, but the number of easily discoverable ghost stories or examples of paranormal activity was very low. This might be partially because the University’s Old College campus was demolished in the late 1800s when the University moved to Gilmorehill. That been said, I did find a few interesting bits.

There is a story from the Western Infirmary, built by the University in the late 1800s:

One night in 1975, Mary McLellan was working as a ward sister at the Western Infirmary in Glasgow. She was setting up a piece of equipment in a room facing a well-lit corridor when she became aware of a “tall, silver-haired man wearing a blue dressing gown and standing near the doorway of the ward opposite”.

He stood still and silent for a moment and then vanished. But she thought nothing of it, assuming he was a patient who had just gone back to bed. “Almost immediately, the ward nurse came over to me,” McLellan recalls. “She was very upset at seeing the apparition. She recognised him as a patient who had died two days previously.” [Source]

The Australian Paranormal Investigators have a short report online of their trip to the University to search for paranormal activity. Their findings were, and I quote, “Frequent EMF fluctuations”, especially in the Memorial Chapel, the Sir Charles Wilson Building (a converted church), and the University Archives.

As a final note, allegedly the horror writer Mary Shelley (of Frankenstein-fame) was influenced by stories of doctors at the University of Glasgow experimenting with bodies that had been hanged at the Tollbooth, just up the road from the Old College. Allegedly.

Whether you believe in ghosts or not, I thought it was something completely different to post here. That, and I had the photo above where we were playing around on campus one evening last May and with some simple camera tricks made my girlfriend appear somewhat see-through in the Cloisters.

Do you know of any ghost stories or reports of sightings at the University of Glasgow?

ABC Sundae is a fortnightly theme day, occurring every other Sunday, one letter of the alphabet at a time.
Click here for more ABC Sundae.

[Nov-Dec 2010 Poll: Should the University Library be open 24 hours a day?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Shadow Man

Shadow ManThere’s more to do on campus in terms of photography than merely photographing the buildings and statues. You can also have a lot of fun while on campus in the late evening, especially with the floodlights on the South Front of the University’s Main Building. I really need to do more of this. =)

[Nov-Dec 2010 Poll: Should the University Library be open 24 hours a day?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

F is for… Fog [ABC Sundae]

F is for... Fog [ABC Sundae]Fog is a rarity in Glasgow, and when it does come for a visit, it seems to have a tendency to stick around for a bit (I’m basing this on my 2.5 year experience of Glasgow’s weather). Apparently the Glasgow-Prestwick Airport (some 32 miles south-west of Glasgow) is the UK’s only fog-free airport, owing to the local weather patterns. I assume this would also help to explain the complete lack of thunder in Glasgow. Then there’s the Irn Bru sky, when the night sky over Glasgow is a rich dark and glowing orange. Have you noticed any other weather peculiarities in and around Glasgow?

With gothic spires, great architecture and leafless trees scattered around campus, it’s a fantastic place for some fog photography. I’ve previously posted a few photos of the University in the midst of fog, which you can see here, here and here.

ABC Sundae is a fortnightly theme day, occurring every other Sunday, one letter of the alphabet at a time.
Click here for more ABC Sundae.

[Nov-Dec 2010 Poll: Should the University Library be open 24 hours a day?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

STAR Glasgow Sleepout

STAR Glasgow SleepoutFor two nights, on November 5th and 6th, STAR (Student Action for Refugees) and Positive Action in Housing had a sleepout on the steps of the Wellington Church to raise awareness and some money for destitute asylum seekers in Glasgow. I popped along for a little bit to take a few photos for them, where the above is from.

[Nov-Dec 2010 Poll: Should the University Library be open 24 hours a day?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

B is for… Boyd Orr [ABC Sundae]

B is for... Boyd Orr [ABC Sundae]I’ve mentioned John Boyd Orr previously, in connection with the poll I held on this blog last November about what is the ugliest building at the University of Glasgow. The Boyd Orr Building came on top of that poll as the runaway winner for the title of “Ugliest Building at the University of Glasgow”. It seems to be somewhat of a habit at the University to remember some of its most famous sons (because there are no buildings named after women at the University of Glasgow) by naming some of the ugliest buildings on campus. Case in point, the Adam Smith Building.

John Boyd Orr (1880-1971), 1st Baron Boyd-Orr, a graduate of Glasgow University, is inarguably one of the greatest Scots ever to have lived. A politician, teacher, doctor, biologist, rector of Glasgow University (1945-47), and chancellor of Glasgow University (1947-1971), Boyd Orr is best known for his quest to end world hunger (for which he won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1949), and was also first Director-General of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). He was also the co-founder and the first President of the World Academy of Art and Science (WAAS). He was knighted in 1949, and lived to be 90 years old. As a University of Glasgow student, it’s alumni like this whose legacy you stand on and study around. No pressure.

I’ll leave you with a quote from the man himself:

There can be no peace in the world so long as a large proportion of the population lack the necessities of life and believe that a change of the political and economic system will make them available. World peace must be based on world plenty. [source]

For more about the Boyd Orr Building and the man who it’s named after, see my previous posts on the subject.

[Sept-Oct 2010 Poll: What societies have you been a member of at Glasgow University?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Fireworks at Glasgow Green

Fireworks at Glasgow Green

The heart of Glasgow’s East End is the 55 hectare (136 acre) Glasgow Green, the city’s oldest park. Its history can be traced back to 1450 when the lands were gifted by King James II to Bishop William Turnbull and the people of Glasgow, just one year before the same people founded the University of Glasgow. Initially the Green was used for grazing cattle, washing and bleaching clothes, drying fishing nets and for swimming.

In the 1820s the common land was laid out as a public park with statues, drinking fountains, children’s playgrounds and other features added. Over the years the public park has been a popular location for army and militia parades and exercises, political and religious meetings and demonstrations, the Glasgow Fair until 1871, pop concerts, funfairs, and an annual fireworks display held on November 5th. The above photo is from the 2009 fireworks display. Public executions took place on the Green up until 1865, when the last person to be executed was hanged (see post on Sauchiehall Street).

Although practically devoid of trees, the Green has several landmark structures, such as the People’s Palace and Winter Gardens, a museum and glasshouse which opened in 1898. Since the 1940s, it has been the museum of social history for the city of Glasgow, and tells the story of the people and the city from 1750 to present. Outside the People’s Palace sits the Doulton Fountain, donated to the city in 1890 when it was moved from Kelvingrove Park after the 1888 Internation Exhibition. At 46 feet high and 70 feet across at its base, it is the largest terracotta fountain in the world and features a slightly larger than life figure of Queen Victoria and groups of waterbearers from Canada, Australia, India and South Africa representing Britain’s Empire.

Glasgow Trivia #25: The centrepiece of Glasgow Green is the 43.5m (144ft) Nelson’s Monument, a stone obelisk commemorating the naval victories of Admiral Horatio Nelson. It was erected in 1806, a year after the Admiral’s death in the Battle of Trafalgar, and was the first monument in the world dedicated to the decorated war hero. In 1810, four years after it was built, the monument was hit by lightning and 6 meters (20ft) of masonry was knocked off from the top. Instead of replacing the fallen section, a lightning conductor was placed in its place. There’s a painting in the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum by John Knox (1778-1845) portraying Nelson’s Monument being struck by lightning.

[Summer 2010 Poll: Where Are You From?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

BBC Alba at the Pacific Quay

BBC Alba

The Pacific Quay area, formerly the site of the Prince’s Docks, on the south bank of the River Clyde, is home to the Digital Media Quarter and the Glasgow Science Centre. The headquarters of BBC Scotland (or BBC Alba in Gaelic), colourfully lit up at night in the above photo, opened in the summer of 2007. The headquarters of BBC Scotland’s main rival, STV, had opened next door a year before the BBC moved in. If you’ve ever watched BBC Scotland, you might recognize Tuesday’s photo as the occasional backdrop for local news.

The Glasgow Science Centre, just next door, is composed of three main buildings: the Science Mall, an IMAX cinema, and the Glasgow Tower. Opened to the public in June 2001 at a cost of £75 million, including £10 million for Glasgow Tower. The crescent-shaped Science Mall houses some 250 interactive science-learning exhibits, a Science Show Theatre and the Glasgow Science Centre Planetarium.

The IMAX cinema is the first and currently only IMAX cinema to have been built in Scotland and screens 3D films as well as standard 2D films in IMAX format. I’ve always thought that the IMAX cinema looked more like an armadillo than the Clyde Auditorium across the river. If you look carefully at the photo above you can kinda make out the distinctive round shape of the IMAX cinema on the right.

The Glasgow Tower is the tallest tower in Scotland at 127 meters (417ft), and holds a Guinness World Record for being the tallest tower in the world in which the whole structure is capable of rotating 360 degrees. Shaped like an aerofoil, the tower is turned by computers into the wind in order to reduce wind resistance. Yes, it’s an aerodynamic building.

Glasgow Trivia #13: Continuing from Tuesday’s Glasgow Trivia, here are a few more Clyde-built ships you might recognize:
PS Waverley. Built in 1946, the PS Waverley is the last seagoing paddle steamer in the world and has been since 1972. She can still be seen in operation on the Clyde.

RMS Queen Mary. Built in 1934, the Queen Mary dominated the North Atlantic routes as the largest and fastest passenger ship around, from 1936 until jet flight brought about its demise. During WW2 she and her sister ship, RMS Queen Elizabeth (built in 1938), were the fastest troop ships in the war, simply too fast for the German submarines to catch. She was retired in 1967 and today she is a floating hotel and museum in Long Beach, California. The Queen Elizabeth was destroyed by fire in 1972 off a harbour in Hong Kong while being converted to a floating university.

RMS Queen Elizabeth 2. The most famous of the Clyde-built ships and often referred to simply as the ‘QE2′, she was built in 1968 and ran transatlantic routes between Southampton and New York, as well as world cruises during active life of almost 40 years. In 1982 she served as a troopship in the Falklands War. She was retired from service by Cunard in 2008, and is currently sitting in dock in Dubai, waiting to be converted into a floating luxury hotel.

[Summer 2010 Poll: Where Are You From?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Byres Road at Night

Byres Road at Night

As a University of Glasgow student you will become very familiar with Byres Road, especially considering its proximity to the University. A quick pint with friends on Ashton Lane, studying for exams at a café, browsing the second-hand shops for treasures… Byres Road will add a lot to your time at University. It’s one of the best things about having a campus in the middle of the city, especially in the bohemian West End.

It is at night when the centre of the West End truly comes alive. Well, on most days at least. Sunday to Thursday the streets are populated by students and young people, with older people taking over during the weekend. This is particularly true of Ashton Lane (featured previously). For example, the area inside and outside the converted church at the top of Byres Road (formerly known as Kelvinside Parish Church and now sporting a blue halo on its spire) is packed with middle-aged revellers until 3am on the weekends.

You might be at University to study for the future, but there’s a whole world right next to you for you to experience. Just find the right balance. =)

Glasgow Trivia #3: In the latter half of the 19th century there were attempts to rename Byres Road to Victoria Road, after Queen Victoria. The residents of the area weren’t too pleased with this and kept calling it by the name they preferred. No prizes for guessing who won the dispute. The words “Victoria Cross” and the year “1876″ high above the corner of Byres Road and Dowanhill Road are reminiscent of this part of the road’s history. Decoration on the wall of the Waitrose supermarket on Byres Road, both inside the the store and outside, recounts the history of the road.

[Summer 2010 Poll: Where Are You From?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

Text in the Garden

Text in the GardenYou may or may not have noticed this, but the anatomy table seats on Library Hill (which I posted a photo of yesterday) have a series of texts by them, telling the background of the installation. The texts are lit up and are especially visible at night. I created the above composite of all of them, as it’s a little difficult and tedious to run around and read all the lit up texts.

  • To Be Set and Sown in the Garden                  Christine Borland, 2001
  • Commissioned to mark the 550th Anniversary of The University of Glasgow
  • The porcelain pillows are replicas of the wooden headrests used in anatomical dissection
  • Each pillow is inscribed with a plant illustrated in Fuchs’ herbal ‘The History of Plants’ 1542
  • The first suggestion of a physic garden in Scotland is a planting list by Mark Jameson
  • Jameson was Rector’s Deputy in 1555, when Glasgow University was sited near the cathedral
  • Jameson’s annotated copy, 1549, of Fuchs’ pocket herbal, is kept in the University Library
  • Many of the plants selected were considered extremely dangerous if taken during pregnancy
  • The reason for Mark Jameson’s selection of plants with gynaecological properties, is unclear

The eagle-eyed among you may have noticed that even though there are ten benches and thus ten pieces of text, there are only nine lines of text in the composite above. The tenth piece of text is missing, replaced by a block of wood and gravel. Anyone have any idea what the final mystery piece of text is supposed t say, or is it supposed to be blank?

[Poll #12: What is your favourite place to study for exams?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

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From Partick Bridge at Night

From Partick Bridge at Night

Digging deep into the magical box of photos, I came across the above photo, taken about this time last year. I’ve said this before, but Partick Bridge offers one of the best postcard worthy views of the University of Glasgow. There’s also a bus stop right next to the bridge where the 747 AirLink bus stops on its way from Glasgow Airport, so if you’re picking friends up by bus from the airport and live in the vicinity of the University, I suggest getting off at this bus stop and offering your visitors a stunning view of the University from the very start.

Every time I come across one of my attempts at taking long exposure photos by a road I’m reminded of the fact that I really need to attempt this more often. One evening I’ve gotta make my way to one of the bridges on to of the M8 to get some (hopefully) nice long exposure shots of cars passing by. If you’re ever trying the same, I suggest trying to catch a passing emergency vehicle. The light effect of the flashing blue lights on top of the emergency vehicles creates an interesting effect. Here’s one I made earlier (opens oven, whips out previously prepared dish photo).

[Poll #11: Where did you live in your first year at Glasgow University?]
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© 2010 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

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Ashton Lane

Ashton Lane, Empty, At Night

Just around the corner from the University, tucked away behind Byres Road, is a small cobblestone street. The above photo features a very uncommon view of Ashton Lane, empty, devoid of revellers. (If you’re looking to see Ashton Lane like this, try after midnight between Sunday and Monday.)

Ashton Lane is one of the foremost party streets in Glasgow, jam-packed with people in their finest party gear every Friday and Saturday evening, sunworshippers sipping cappuccinos on sunny days, students catching a few pints after classes, people dining at the Ubiquitous Chip or at any other the many other restaurants (2 for 1 gourmet burgers anyone?), and with people catching a movie at the Grosvenor Cinema (£2 for students on Tuesdays!).

You’ll notice that students tend to frequent Ashton Lane during the week and especially in the afternoons and early evenings, replaced for the evenings and especially the weekend’s party nights by a better dressed and thicker walleted group of people. A little cruel twist of humor: imagine drunken people on high heels trying to walk on wet cobblestones. Great entertainment!

You can get a bit of history about Ashton Lane on Wikipedia.

[Poll #4: Which Student Union(s) do you belong to (or use to belong to)?] Click on the photo above for a larger version. Please rate the photo below! © 2009 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

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From Sauchiehall Street

University from Sauchiehall Street

Once again, the South Front of the Main Building of the University of Glasgow, this time from the western end of Sauchiehall Street, one of the main streets running through the central parts of Glasgow. To the right lies Kelvin Way, which leads through Kelvingrove Park to the bottom of University Avenue. The building to the left of this shot is the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, the most popular museum in Scotland. Past that is the Transportation Museum, so with the Hunterian Museum included, this area of Glasgow has an impressive concentration of fantastic museum items on display.

For a number of students, this sight is a common one, as just south of this spot lie the Cairncross House and Kelvinhaugh Street student apartments.

Every now and then I’ll step outside the University campus and show some of the surrounding area, although I’ll be sure to always have some little link to the University, no matter how insignificant the link may be.

Interesting little tidbit: According to Wikipedia, Sauchiehall roughly translates to ‘Way of the Willows’.

[Poll #3: Which Academic Faculty do you belong to at Glasgow University?] Click on the photo above for a larger version. © 2009 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

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