Your University, One Photo at a Time

H is for… Hunter [ABC Sundae]

H is for... Hunter

The name ‘Hunter’ has popped up every now and then on this blog, and around campus, usually in the form of ‘Hunterian’. The name “Hunter” refers to not one, but two people with connections to the University of Glasgow.

The photo above is of the Hunter Memorial, just behind the Memorial Gates and in front of the Hunterian Museum part of the Main Building, which was unveiled on June 24th back in 1925. (Photo of the Hunter Memorial in 1951)  The two names on the memorial, next to the round representations of their faces, are William Hunter on the right, and John Hunter on the left. The middle bit accommodates a statue of St Kentigern and a Latin inscription, of which I’ll post a closer photo soon.

William Hunter (1718-1783) was a graduate of the University and a distinguished anatomist and obstetrician. He bequeathed his extensive collections of “anatomical and pathological preparations, coins, books and manuscripts and botanical, geological and other materials” (source) to the University and financed the creation of a museum to house this collection. That extensive collection has grown to be the broad Hunterian Museum spread around campus. (Bio) (Wikipedia)

John Hunter (1728-1793), William’s younger brother, was a professor at Glasgow University, among other vocations such as surgeon to King George III, and is primarily known as a surgeon and scientist. The Hunterian Society of London, a society of physicians and dentists based in London, was founded in his honor. (Bio) (Wikipedia)

Most of the information presented here came from The University of Glasgow Story, a website maintained by the University’s Archive Services.

ABC Sundae is a fortnightly theme day, occurring every other Sunday, one letter of the alphabet at a time. Click here for more ABC Sundae.

[Poll #7: What grade would you give the year 2009?]
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© 2009 GlasgowUniPhoto.com

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